Visiting an orthopaedist can be an unwelcome experience in general – most people are often unwilling to go and tend to delay their visits to the orthopaedic doctors. This is because of the fear of surgeries, or that they may be asked to refrain from certain activities. However, visiting an orthopaedist is important and prevents your pains from getting worse. Below are some helpful tips to prepare yourself prior to the visit:

• Visit notes and other test notes – if you have visited a sports surgeon Sydney, general practitioner, etc. or paid a visit to the emergency room with regards to your muscle or joint paints, you will naturally have visit notes from those visits. It is a good idea to take these visit notes together with you and present them to the orthopaedist – he will be grateful to have further insight into your pain and disorder. Furthermore, you might also have been asked to do some tests (for example, MRI scans and X-ray scans) – make sure you to take these with you too. You can ask for a CD with the scans from the practitioner. This will reduce the possibility of having to redo tests and waste time for them.

• Fill out forms and questionnaires beforehand – whether you visit a hip surgeon or a normal orthopaedist, you will usually be asked to fill a few questionnaires and forms about you. This is to allow the doctor to understand more about your pains and to narrow down the symptoms to identify what disorder, disease or deformity you have. Usually, filling out these forms and questionnaires takes a lot of time, and most of the time, if you don’t come prepared, you will end up filling these forms while in the waiting room and to help improve your mobility. To avoid wasting time filling forms and delaying your examination, fill out any forms and questionnaires the institution or clinic hands you beforehand.

• Write down the injuries and pains you got – as people are usually reluctant to visit orthopaedists, they often delay their visits for weeks and even months. As such, it might be difficult to properly remember when you first felt discomfort or pain in your joints and muscles. Instead of being stumped for answers in the exam room when the doctor questions you, it is a good idea to write down details of the pain (i.e. when you first felt it, how often you feel it, or what you think causes it) beforehand.

• Jot down the questions you want to ask – just like the doctor will ask you questions about your pain, it is natural that you might want to ask certain questions from the doctor. It is a good idea to jot down whatever you want to ask from the doctor, so that you don’t forget or waste time remembering them in the exam room.